Are YOU a workaholic? Here are the tell-tale signs that you could be

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Written By Maya Cantina

As smartphones and modern technology mean more of us are working ‘out of hours’, addiction to work is becoming a serious problem for some. 

Whether you’re isolating yourself from friends and family or neglecting vital self care, it might be time to ask yourself whether YOU are a ‘workaholic’. 

As Sherwood screenwriter James Graham opened up about attending ‘Workaholics Anonymous’ for his ‘addiction’, MailOnline looks at the common signs you too are addicted to your job. 

Workaholics will use the hours they should spend sleeping finishing off work-related tasks (Stock photo) 

Lying to loved ones 

If you’re lying to friends and family about ‘stupid’ things such as what time you wake up in the morning, or whether or not you’ve eaten, it might mean you are addicted to work but are too embarrassed to admit it. 

Neglecting self care 

Working hard and achieving goals can be an important act of self care. 

However, if in doing so you are neglecting daily tasks such as eating, showering and sleeping, it might mean you are a workaholic. 

Those addicted to work will use the hours they should spend sleeping finishing off work-related tasks or getting ahead on projects. 

Work addicts might also put healthy chores such as cooking and exercising to the back of their mind, or opt for easy junk food options instead of proper meals.  

Sabotaging relationships

Whether they’re romantic or platonic, relationships can take a huge hit if they are not given the time and energy needed to nurture them. 

Workaholics have a tendency to put work tasks above the people they love, frequently cancelling plans to stay longer at the office or returning to projects once they get home. 

Low self-esteem and problems with intimacy

As screenwriter James Graham explained, too much of a workaholic’s sense of self-worth comes from their working life – leading to difficulties with relationships and intimacy. 

If you’re self-esteem and validation comes primarily from success in the workplace, your overall opinion of yourself might fall dramatically if things are not going so well professionally. 

‘All of my self-esteem, all of my validation, all of my happiness and joy was coming from my work and I didn’t allow myself to believe there was space for anything else,’ Graham explained. 

If you are the first person in the office and the last to leave, it might mean you are a workaholic (Stock photo)

If you are the first person in the office and the last to leave, it might mean you are a workaholic (Stock photo) 

Not dressing appropriately 

If you are too busy rushing to be the first one in the office to iron your clothes or check the weather forecast, it might mean you are a workaholic. 

For example, forgetting to wear a coat in the middle of winter might mean you are too absorbed with work to think ahead.  

Intense fear of failure

If you constantly feel anxious about your work performance or put in extra hours out of fear of failure, it may mean you have become a workaholic. 

The inability to switch off after a stressful day at work and the fear of not performing well enough may eat into someone’s mental health. 

Being the first to arrive and the last to leave 

If you find you are the first person to arrive at the office every morning but are still the last to leave, it might mean you are spending too much time at work and not enough time nurturing other important aspects of your life. 

Multitasking 

If you are constantly engaging in multiple tasks at once, it might mean you have become too addicted to your job. 

Thinking about work while doing other things 

If work is on your mind while you are driving, spending time with friends or drifting off to sleep, it might mean you are thinking about it far too much. 

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