Baby on board! Incredible moment Brit doctor helps pregnant Jordanian passenger give birth mid-flight after she went into labour on London-bound Wizz Air jet: Mother and baby in ‘good condition’ after plane diverts to Italy

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Written By Maya Cantina

A British doctor aboard a Wizz Air flight from Jordan to London helped deliver a baby mid-air before the jet was forced to land in Italy.

Hassan Khan, 28, revealed he was flying home from a holiday in Amman on Saturday morning when the flight crew called for a doctor.

According to the doctor who works at Basildon Hospital, the expecting mother was lying on the floor outside the cockpit after her waters had broken.

Scrambling to her side, Hassan said the Jordanian woman did not speak any English and another passenger had to translate during the delivery.

‘I told the flight attendants what equipment I needed – which would include an oxygen mask, a clamp for the umbilical chord and a stethoscope – none of which they had on a plane, of course,’ Hassan told BBC.

Hassan Khan, 28, helped deliver a seven-moth old baby after a Jordanian passenger’s waters broke on a flight from Jordan to London

The doctor of four years (pictured third from left) works at Basildon Hospital, Essex, and luckily had experience in neonatal resucitation

The doctor of four years (pictured third from left) works at Basildon Hospital, Essex, and luckily had experience in neonatal resucitation

He revealed he had only used towels during the ‘miraculous’ delivery of the baby girl.

The doctor of four years, who luckily had experience in neonatal resucitation, said he also managed to relax the panicked mother after reassuring her through the translator that he had worked with newborns before.

‘People were saying it was miraculous. I only realised how significant it was after I had the chance to process it all,’ he explained.

Following the baby chaos, the Wizz Air plane was diverted to Brindisi Airport, in southern Italy, so the 38-year-old mother and her baby could be taken to Perrino hospital.

Hassan joked he was late to his shift because of the unexpected diversion, but his employers were impressed with his quick-thinking and wanted the full update.

‘My consultant congratulated me and said it was a really good job,’ he said.

According to a report by online newspaper, Open, the baby was born at just seven months old.

The Wizz Air jet made an emergency land in Italy so the mother and baby could go to hospital (via Shutterstock)

The Wizz Air jet made an emergency land in Italy so the mother and baby could go to hospital (via Shutterstock)

The hero doctor said the woman’s family updated him from the hospital and revealed that thanks to his aid, both her and her baby were in a good condition. 

The parents of the baby girl, who they named Sama, told local Italian newspaper Corriere del Mezzogiorno that she didn’t even need an incubator,’ despite being two months premature.

But this isn’t the first time a newborn has been delivered in the clouds.

In May last year, 17-year-old Abigail Amoretti went into labour during a flight from Managua, Nicaragua, to Miami. 

The newborn was bot breathing after a team of three doctors helped in delivery, but was luckily able to breathe on her own after around three minutes of emergency CPR.

In October 2021, Kendria Rhoden, 21, gave birth to her son on a flight to the Dominican republic.

The health worker from Connecticut was left in shcok when her waters broke and revealed she was not expecting to gove brith until the end of the month.

Medical support firm MedAire reports that mid-air births occur in roughly one in every 26 million passengers.

Dr. Paulo Alves, the company’s global medical director, told Condé Nast in January: ‘In-flight childbirth is very, very rare, and when you review the cases they were unexpected—these were premature babies.

He added that giving birth in mid-air comes with its own challenges.

‘It’s not the best place for you to have your child, for many reasons. For one thing, the air is thinner, so it’s harder for the baby to breathe. It’s like giving birth to a premature child in Mexico City, altitude-wise.’

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