Chris Broussard Says 1 Team Is A ‘Bad Matchup’ For Lakers

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Written By Maya Cantina

(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

The Los Angeles Lakers headed into yesterday’s game against the division-rival Sacramento Kings with high hopes of gaining some ground in the playoff picture in the Western Conference, as it would give them a chance to turn the tables on Mike Brown’s squad when it comes to seeding.

The Lakers players knew this game would be crucial as it would help dictate where they landed in the playoff picture in the West, and the team came out firing on all cylinders and was well on it’s way to a big win.

Unfortunately, in classic Lakers fashion, the team fell apart in the second quarter, with former Lakers guard Malik Monk getting hot, leading to a 19-point lead evaporating for Los Angeles.

Although the Lakers showed flashes of a potential comeback at times, Sacramento was motivated and determined to win on the road, and that’s exactly what happened, with star guard De’Aaron Fox dropping 44 points on Los Angeles.

With the Lakers once again deflated and looking for answers, the brutal schedule will continue for LeBron James and company on Friday against the visiting Milwaukee Bucks.

In the aftermath of the loss to the Kings, Chris Broussard of FOX Sports admits Sacramento is a bad matchup for Los Angeles via First Things First.

“The Kings are a bad matchup for the Lakers,” Broussard said. “They’ve beaten them now seven of the last eight games.”

At this point in time, there’s no telling whether this Lakers team can contend with any team that is playoff-bound in the West during a seven-game series, as there’s no way to tell how well they’ll play from night to night.

That said, it could be an early exit for Darvin Ham’s squad this season, leading to an offseason filled with uncertainty.

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