Connecticut Dem successfully has new legislation amended to include phrase ‘expectant mothers’ after branding woke alternative ‘pregnant persons’ an ‘affront’

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Written By Maya Cantina

A Connecticut Democrat successfully put forth new legislation amended to include the phrase ‘expectant mothers’ after branding the woke alternative, ‘pregnant persons’, as offensive. 

State Rep. Robyn Porter, a Democrat representing New Haven, proposed an amendment to House Bill 5454 to incorporate the term ‘expectant mothers’ during discussions on a bill regarding state funding on Thursday. 

‘My children call me mother, ma, mommy. It depends on the day,’ Porter said Thursday. ‘I don’t answer to pregnant person or birthing person. That’s not what I answer to.

‘A huge part of my identity is wrapped around being a mother and a grandmother. So I find it an affront that someone would try to tell me that what they’re putting on paper for the purpose of policy covers me when I’m telling you that it doesn’t,’ she continued. 

State Rep. Robyn Porter, a Democrat representing New Haven, proposed an amendment to House Bill 5454 to incorporate the term ‘expectant mothers’ during discussions on a bill regarding state funding on Thursday

The primary advocate for the original language of 'pregnant persons' in the bill, launched by the Human Services Committee, was Rep. Jillian Gilchrest

The primary advocate for the original language of ‘pregnant persons’ in the bill, launched by the Human Services Committee, was Rep. Jillian Gilchrest 

 

The bill was originally launched by the Human Services Committee before reaching appropriations to incorporate the phrase ‘expectant mothers’ to lines five and six.

The original lines of the bill read ‘… shall create a strategic plan to maximize federal and state resources for mental health services for children six years old and younger, their caregivers and pregnant persons.’

Lawmakers voted 32-16 to adopt the term ‘mothers’ following a 35-minute debate.

The unexpected decision was achieved through a coalition of Republicans and members of the legislature’s black and Puerto Rican Caucus – with all 16 opposing votes coming from Democrats.

Porter stated, ‘We want to talk about discrimination? Well, I’m here to tell you that black people in America know that very well.

‘This is where I really get frustrated in this building because what we say is dismissed, disregarded, disrespected. … I’m always asked to compromise when I come to the table, and I’m expected to do so. 

She added, ‘We were mothers first. Yes, times are changing, and I’m fine with that because that’s life… But you don’t get to grow, and you don’t get to talk about diversity, equity, and inclusion and exclude me and the other women like me who identify as mothers. You don’t get to do that.’

She said some women ‘want to be called mothers. What’s wrong with that?’   

Lawmakers voted 32-16 to adopt the term 'mothers' following a 35-minute debate (State Rep. Robyn Porter pictured Oct. 26)

 Lawmakers voted 32-16 to adopt the term ‘mothers’ following a 35-minute debate (State Rep. Robyn Porter pictured Oct. 26)

The bill was originally launched by the Human Services Committee before reaching appropriations to incorporate the phrase 'expectant mothers' to lines five and six (Rep. Jillian Gilchrest, Democratic State Representative in the 18th district of Connecticut pictured)

The bill was originally launched by the Human Services Committee before reaching appropriations to incorporate the phrase ‘expectant mothers’ to lines five and six (Rep. Jillian Gilchrest, Democratic State Representative in the 18th district of Connecticut pictured)

The primary advocate for the original language of ‘pregnant persons’ in the bill was Rep. Jillian Gilchrest, a Democrat from West Hartford. 

‘Pregnant person is actually the inclusive term,’ Gilchrest said. ‘It is a gender neutral term, and it would encompass expectant mothers, pregnant women. 

‘As we talk about DEI, this is the direction we are hoping to move in in this state and ideally across the country.

‘And so the term pregnant persons is the more inclusive term, and so I would ask my colleagues to oppose the amendment.’

Many legislators representing the state’s major urban cities rallied in support of Porter’s amendment.

State Rep. Geraldo Reyes, a Democrat from Waterbury and a prominent figure in the black and Puerto Rican Caucus, emphasized the cultural significance of motherhood.

‘Culturally, as a Puerto Rican person, there is nothing more sacred than a mother… There is only one mother … Just as I opposed the word Latinx, I oppose the word expecting person,’ he said.

Similarly, Rep. Minnie Gonzalez, a Democrat from Hartford backed Porter’s amendment and emphasized his support for the LGBT community.

‘It’s nothing against the LGBT community. It’s nothing about them,’ he said. ‘Nothing against them. We support them … We recognize that they have rights, but where are my rights? I have the right to defend my rights.’

Rep. Anthony Nolan, a New London Democrat was emphasized then importance of the word ‘mother’ in black communities. 

‘I’m just astonished by some of the things that are being said,’ he said.  ‘In black culture, who really are ingrained with that word mother, for us to go home and call our mother something other than a mother, we would end up with a slap across the face. 

‘We’re not removing anything. We’re just asking to add something that is dear to those that are speaking in regards to it, especially in the black culture.’ 

Last year, the CDC was slammed for 'appalling' new health guidance in which it replaced the word 'women' with the gender-neutral term 'pregnant people'

Last year, the CDC was slammed for ‘appalling’ new health guidance in which it replaced the word ‘women’ with the gender-neutral term ‘pregnant people’

The CDC's flu vaccine guidance, which was updated on September 7, 2023, was void of all mention of pregnant women and used the term 'pregnant people' instead

The CDC’s flu vaccine guidance, which was updated on September 7, 2023, was void of all mention of pregnant women and used the term ‘pregnant people’ instead

DailyMail.com found that all gender-specific terms ¿ including 'she', 'her', 'women' and 'mother' ¿ were wiped from the CDC's recommendations for the respiratory virus and Covid vaccinations, when it was updated last month

DailyMail.com found that all gender-specific terms — including ‘she’, ‘her’, ‘women’ and ‘mother’ — were wiped from the CDC’s recommendations for the respiratory virus and Covid vaccinations, when it was updated last month

Last year, the CDC was slammed for ‘appalling’ new health guidance in which it replaced the word ‘women’ with the gender-neutral term ‘pregnant people.’

The erasure of the term women can be seen in recommendations for a host of respiratory virus vaccinations for pregnant women.

This includes material promoting shots for Covid, flu and RSV – a common respiratory condition that most affects older adults and young children.

Although usually mild, all three viruses can be deadly in pregnant women.

All gender-specific terms — including ‘she,’ ‘her,’ ‘women’ and ‘mother’ — were replaced with gender-neutral terms like ‘pregnant people’ and ‘pregnant person.’ 

A doctors’ organization said the CDC was ‘cowering to political forces’ at the expense of sound medical advice at the time. 

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