French Prime Minister Borne Is Out: Macron Needs To Remake His Failing Government Ahead of European Elections and Paris Olympics

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Written By Maya Cantina

French Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne is out. MSM headlines worldwide will say that she resigned, which is formally correct – but make no mistake, she was ‘fired’ by Macron, as she makes it clear on her resignation letter.

Her departure from the government was long and widely expected. Back in April, leftist Politico wrote a piece calledElisabeth Borne: Macron’s fall gal – Firing the prime minister is unlikely to solve Emmanuel Macron’s problems‘.

President Emmanuel Macron now seeks to reboot his failing second mandate ahead of European parliament elections and of the Paris Olympics this summer.

Read: MACRON FOLDS: France Withdraws Diplomatic Presence in Niger – Security Agreement Is Also Over, and French Military Troops to Depart in the Next Few Months

Reuters reported:

“The change in prime minister comes after a year marred by political crises triggered by contested reforms of the pension system and immigration laws.

It also comes just five months before European Parliament elections, with eurosceptics expected to make record gains at a time of widespread public discontent over surging living costs and the failure of European governments to curb migration flows.”

Read: After France Runs Out of Africa Under His Watch, Globalist President Emmanuel Macron Deals With Separatism From Corsica, Offers ‘Limited Autonomy’

Macron is trailing badly Marine Le Pen’s party by some eight to ten points, in the run up to a June vote.

The toughened immigration rules approval exposed deep cracks in Macron’s centrist majority.

“The change in prime minister will not necessarily lead to a shift in political tack, but rather signal a desire to move beyond the pension and immigration reforms and focus on new priorities, including hitting full employment.”

Read: Defiant Macron Says He’s Not a ‘Lame Duck’ President, Defends the New Tough Immigration Bill: ’It’s What the French People Wanted’

Borne was prime minister since May 2022, and was the second woman to serve as PM.

“Macron and his government, led by Borne, have struggled to deal with a more turbulent parliament to pass laws since losing their absolute majority shortly after Macron was reelected for a second mandate in 2022.

The French president’s advisers say he has managed to pass the most challenging parts of his economic manifesto in the first year and a half of his second mandate, despite the lack of an absolute majority, and that future reforms, on education and euthanasia for instance, will be more consensual.”

Macron’s took the tyrannical decision to bypass congress and use executive powers last year to pass a contested pension reform that triggered weeks of violent protests.

Macron on X: “Madam Prime Minister, dear @Elisabeth_Borne, your work in the service of our Nation has been exemplary every day. You implemented our project with the courage, commitment and determination of women of states. With all my heart, thank you.”

Read: Macron in Hot Water for Defending Gérard Depardieu: ‘He Makes France Proud’ – French Film Star Is Facing an Array of Rape and Sexual Assault Allegations

Borne’s ‘resignation’ comes after days of speculation about a government reshuffle.

The Guardian reported:

“In her resignation letter, Borne said it was ‘more necessary than ever to continue the reforms’ being pursued by the government.

‘I wanted to tell you how passionate I have been about this mission’, she wrote, adding that she was ‘guided by the constant concern, which we share, to achieve rapid and tangible results for our fellow citizens’.

However, she made it clear the decision to go had not been not hers and that she had taken note of the president’s wish to appoint a new prime minister.”

Borne was appointed PM in May 2022. Weeks later, the government lost its absolute majority in the Assemblée Nationale in a general election.

“It meant Borne, as head of a minority government, was forced to push contested legislation promised in Macron’s presidential campaign, including an overhaul of the pension system and an immigration bill, through parliament often with recourse to a controversial constitutional clause, the 49:3, that avoided a vote on the issues. Borne’s government used the clause a total of 23 times.”

Read more:

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