NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 76, ‘rushed to UCLA hospital with a broken hip after slipping at a concert in LA’

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Written By Maya Cantina

NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has been hospitalized after breaking his hip.

As reported by TMZ, the 7-foot-2 76-year-old fell at a concert in Los Angeles, resulting in a shattered him.

Paramedics rushed Abdul-Jabbar to the emergency room, and while his condition hasn’t been disclosed, his rep, Deborah Morales, told TMZ that the Hall of Famer is being cared for by the ‘amazing medical team and doctors at UCLA Hospital.’

Neither the location of the concert nor the performer has been identified. 

This medical emergency comes three years after Abdul-Jabbar revealed he had beaten prostate cancer.  

NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has been hospitalized after breaking his hip

The NBA’s second all-time leading scorer behind LeBron James, Abdul-Jabbar has been synonymous with basketball dating back to his high school days in New York City. 

The top recruit in the country, Lew Alcindor, as he was then known, opted to join UCLA, where he won a national title in each of his three seasons. 

He would go on to win one NBA crown alongside Oscar Robertson with the Milwaukee Bucks before winning four more with Magic Johnson and the Los Angeles Lakers. 

Among his many roles, Abdul-Jabbar now serves as a health ambassador for his alma-mater, UCLA, because he wanted to make inroads with African-American communities to be sure they’re getting proper medical attention.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar goes up for a sky hook against  Bill Laimbeer in Game 3 of the 1989 NBA Finals

Once known as Lew Alcindor, Abdul-Jabbar was a college basketball legend at UCLA

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was known for his skyhook in the NBA after his NCAA career at UCLA

To Abdul-Jabbar, a longtime civil rights activist, the topic is nothing new. Healthcare inequality is inextricably linked to other forms of racism in the US dating back centuries.

And the more he encounters, Abdul-Jabbar wrote in 2020, the more it feels like an endless cycle.

‘It’s as if the black community is trapped in Groundhog Day in which every day we fight racism, prove it exists, see gains, and then wake up the next day to all the same obstacles,’ he concluded. ‘In the movie, Bill Murray escaped the cycle by becoming selfless, caring more about others’ needs than his greedy desires. That’s how America will escape this self-destructive behavior.

‘The future of equity for black Americans starts with physical and mental health, and as long as they are at the end of the line for services, true equity can’t happen. Black lives have to matter in every aspect of American society if they are to thrive.’

ᴀʀᴛɪᴄʟᴇ ꜱᴏᴜʀᴄᴇ

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