Solar eclipse 2024 (almost) makes it to NYC! Crowds gather on skyscrapers to watch the moon cover 90% of the sun in the Big Apple

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Written By Maya Cantina

The 2024 solar eclipse is at its peak in New York City, where observers are looking at nearly 90 percent of the moon’s shadow covering the the sun.

Peak coverage occured at 3.25pm, about 80 minutes after the eclipse started at about ten past 2pm. The event begins anywhere when the edge of the moon touches the edge of the sun.

The eclipse, which will reach totality in upstate New York, closer to the Syracuse area, will only cover 90 percent of the sun in NYC. Instead of total darkness, the city looks as though it is experiencing a very cloudy day.

Upstate, where darkness will really descend, thousands have gathered with their family and friends Niagara falls, Buffalo, and the areas surrounding the finger lakes to observe the celestial event.

In The Big Apple, hoards are gathered at prime viewing locations including ‘The Edge,’ which is the observation deck at Hudson Yards.

People gather on ‘The Edge’ observation deck ahead of a total solar eclipse across North America, in New York City on April 8, 2024

Celestial observers take pictures on 'The Edge' observation deck in NYC ahead of Monday afternoon's solar eclipse

Celestial observers take pictures on ‘The Edge’ observation deck in NYC ahead of Monday afternoon’s solar eclipse

The eclipse is en route to travel more than 4,000 miles across North America, as its path of totality began in Texas and will travel through parts of the South, to New York State, and wind up in Maine.

It made landfall in Mazatlan, Mexico on Monday morning and is moving along a path of 15 states.

In NYC, skies will begin darkening around 2.50pm, and will be brightening again by 4pm.

Though the Big Apple is not in the path of totality, parts of upstate New York will experience total darkness for up to four minutes and 28 seconds.

Monday’s eclipse will last almost twice as long as the great eclipse in 2017. There will also be more than twice as many people in the path of totality.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul reported to Niagara Falls State Park ahead of the eclipse on Monday. She previously said the state was prepared to welcome an increased flow of visitors ahead of the event.

More than 1million people are visiting New York for the eclipse. 

‘This truly is a once-in-a-generation event, and my administration has been working for 18 months to ensure a safe and enjoyable viewing experience for all. With our world class parks and charming downtowns, I encourage visitors to come for the eclipse, but stay for all that New York has to offer,’ she said ahead of Monday.

A woman looks toward the sky as the eclipse begins in NYC

A woman looks toward the sky as the eclipse begins in NYC

New York City will be plunged into 90 percent darkness at 3.25pm

New York City will be plunged into 90 percent darkness at 3.25pm

This year's path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip

This year’s path of totality is 115 miles (185 kilometers) wide and home to nearly 32 million Americans, with an additional 150 million living less than 200 miles from the strip

A big day for the profit model of 'The Edge' at Hudson Yards, where tickets begin at $41

A big day for the profit model of ‘The Edge’ at Hudson Yards, where tickets begin at $41

Upstate, in the direct path of totality of the eclipse, families and friends gather to observe the event

People camp out at Prospect Point hours before the total solar eclipse in Niagara Falls,

Children turn up to watch the eclipse in NASA suits as the space event encourages wide interest across the country

Children turn up to watch the eclipse in NASA suits as the space event encourages wide interest across the country

Adrian Plaza, 9, of Queens, tests his eclipse glasses ahead of a partial solar eclipse, where the moon will partially blot out the sun, at New York Hall of Science in Queens borough, New York City

Adrian Plaza, 9, of Queens, tests his eclipse glasses ahead of a partial solar eclipse, where the moon will partially blot out the sun, at New York Hall of Science in Queens borough, New York City 

A total solar eclipse will move across North America and be visible for up to four minutes

A total solar eclipse will move across North America and be visible for up to four minutes

The Empire State Building is seen as a man takes a photo from the 'Edge at Hudson Yards' observation deck

The Empire State Building is seen as a man takes a photo from the ‘Edge at Hudson Yards’ observation deck

New York Governor Kathy Hochul speaks to the media at Niagara Falls State Park ahead of a total solar eclipse across North America

New York Governor Kathy Hochul speaks to the media at Niagara Falls State Park ahead of a total solar eclipse across North America

In Niagara Falls, photographers lined up early in the morning to snag the best spot to get pictures of the eclipse.

Astrophotographer Stan Honda told CNN photographers of any skill level can capture photos of the eclipse as long as they have a sturdy, steady tripod and a remote shutter release for your camera. 

‘With pretty much any kind of camera or any lens, you can get a good picture of the eclipse,’ he said. ‘I would just recommend a fairly sturdy tripod, to make your setup pretty steady, and a remote shutter release, because that allows you to take the pictures without jarring or moving the camera too much.’ 

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