– Treat ovarian cysts effectively: what you need to know

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Written By Maya Cantina

Do you suffer from a functional ovarian cyst and are you looking for effective treatment methods? Our article gives you a comprehensive overview of the treatment options and informs you when surgical intervention may be necessary.

  • Medical therapy: Hormonal treatments such as birth control pills or progestin therapy can be used to treat ovarian cysts
  • Surgical treatment: If the complaints are severe, the cyst is of a certain size or there is a high risk of degeneration, surgery may be necessary. This includes ovary-sparing operations, removal of the ovaries or additional removal of the fallopian tubes.
  • Self-management: Regular check-ups are important to monitor the development of the cysts and to respond to changes in a timely manner.
  • Prediction: Most functional ovarian cysts resolve on their own and require no treatment. However, treatment may be necessary if there are certain risk factors or complications.

If ovarian cysts occur as part of polycystic ovary syndrome or endometriosis disease, the underlying disease must be treated.

Medical therapy

For smaller, less symptomatic, and probably benign cysts, drug therapy for functional ovarian cysts may be tried. Hormone treatments with progestin tablets can prevent further growth of ovarian cysts and lead to withdrawal bleeding, although there are also conflicting research results. The traditional contraceptive pill regulates the menstrual cycle and prevents the eggs from maturing and can therefore prevent the growth of cysts. If ovarian cysts return, it may be useful to take a contraceptive pill as a preventative measure. However, it is important to always talk to your doctor before taking any medications to clarify potential risks, side effects, and interactions.

Surgical treatment

In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat ovarian cysts. This is especially true if the cyst causes severe or persistent pain, has reached a certain size, or is at high risk of becoming malignant. Surgery may attempt to preserve the ovary and remove only the cyst. However, if there is a high risk of degeneration or the patient is already menopausal, removal of the ovaries may also be considered.

In some cases, for example if there is an increased risk of ovarian cancer, it may even be necessary to remove the ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus. However, such a decision is always made individually and the benefits and risks are carefully weighed. There are also several benign and malignant changes in the ovaries that may have a cyst-like appearance and are usually removed surgically.

Self-management

Self-management plays an important role in the treatment of ovarian cysts. Because most cysts do not cause symptoms and go away on their own, monitoring should be done to monitor the development of the cysts. If there is a familial risk of ovarian cancer, in addition to close monitoring, a comprehensive histological evaluation of the ovarian cysts should be performed, especially if the cyst is conspicuous in appearance. If the cyst ruptures or rotates on its axis, which can cause severe pain and affect blood flow to the ovaries, medical advice should be sought immediately.

prediction

The prognosis for ovarian cysts is usually good. Most functional ovarian cysts resolve on their own and require no treatment. However, treatment may be necessary if there are certain risk factors or complications. In some cases, an ovarian cyst can also be a sign of a more serious condition, such as: B. Ovarian cancer. In such cases, early diagnosis is important. If ovarian cysts occur as part of endometriosis or polymystious ovary syndrome, this underlying disease should be treated first.

Medical specialist

dr. med. Leonie Gode is an experienced specialist in the field of gynecology and obstetrics. Her career began with studies in human medicine at Ruprechts-Karls University in Heidelberg. During her studies, she gained valuable experience as a student operating room assistant in trauma surgery at the Theresien Hospital in Mannheim. Her passion for gynecology led her to the Deaconess Hospital in Mannheim and later to the Perinatal Center Level I of the Aschaffenburg Clinic, where she worked intensively on prenatal medicine. Her thesis on mortality prediction in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia was published in the renowned “Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine”. Since 2022, she has been co-owner of the gynecology practice “am Glockenturm” in Mainaschaff and Großwallstadt. In addition to the entire spectrum of gynecology, she has specialized in the field of fertility, prenatal diagnosis and the care of (high-risk) patients. ) pregnancies Her expertise and commitment make her a valued specialist and researcher in her field.

Important note: This is general information only. We do not pretend to be complete. If you suspect an ovarian cyst, see a doctor immediately. This information can never replace the advice of a doctor.

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