Mina Kimes Names Her Favorite Landing Spot For Michael Penix Jr.

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Written By Maya Cantina

(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

The Las Vegas Raiders thought quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo could become the face of their franchise and lead their team to a Super Bowl after his success with the San Francisco 49ers.

Garoppolo’s tenure lasted seven games, and the quarterback was released in March to end this short-lived experiment.

Without a quarterback of the future, which signal-caller could Las Vegas target in the 2024 NFL Draft?

ESPN analyst Mina Kimes threw Michael Penix Jr.’s name into the ring, calling the Raiders her top spot for Penix to begin his NFL career, as shared via her Twitter account.

Kimes went through multiple reasons why Las Vegas should target Penix.

First, the analyst noted Penix’s age as an “older prospect,” one that has experience above most younger quarterbacks in this year’s draft class and someone that could quickly assimilate to the NFL game.

Kimes also mentioned Las Vegas’ offensive line as a potential issue for most quarterbacks, but Penix’s mobility and quick release would keep pressure off the rookie quarterback.

The existing wide receiver group would also benefit with Penix, Kimes observed, as Davante Adams and Jakobi Meyers are similar to Penix’s former receiving corps with the Washington Huskies.

Currently, the Raiders have quarterbacks Aidan O’Connell, Gardner Minshew, and Anthony Brown Jr. on their roster.

Penix could immediately compete for playing time and the starting job, Kimes added.

The Raiders have the No. 13 pick in the 2024 NFL Draft, and Kimes said that Penix could be available later in the draft for Las Vegas if they choose to use that high pick on another player instead.

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