Steinmeier and Macron are working together to stoke anti-right-wing sentiment

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Written By Maya Cantina

BERLIN. Federal President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron have jointly agreed on this Participation in the EU parliamentary elections called. They warned of the likely consequences of a success for EU skeptics. “It is not surprising that those who question freedom, human rights and democracy are exactly the same who question the European project,” Steinmeier said, calling on citizens to say “Yes to” Europe on June 9 .

Macron, who is on a three-day state visit to Germany, was also concerned about the predicted electoral success of EU-critical parties. “I really believe that Europe can die.” People’s fear of change is responsible for this. He recommended addressing this. “But not by promoting bad ideas and demagoguery,” he added. Voters could not expect that “any party could flip a switch” so that the situation would be the way they wanted it.

Macron fears Le Pen’s success

The French head of state explicitly criticized the Rassemblement National (RN). “It is also my responsibility to dismantle his ideas,” he said. According to recent studies Marine Le Pen’s party expected up to 33 percent in the EU elections. This would mean that it would receive more than twice as many votes as the Brussels-friendly list ensemble around Macron’s party.

Meanwhile, Le Pen called on Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni to unite right-wing parties. “If it is successful, we will have the second largest group in the European Parliament. “I don’t think we should miss such an opportunity,” said the RN figurehead in conversation with the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera. Currently, the Rassemblement is part of the Identity and Democracy group, while Meloni’s Fratelli d’Italia is part of the European Conservatives and Reformists. (kuk)

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