Buckingham Palace gates are boarded up after driver crashed into them in late-night smash which saw armed police yell ‘keep your hands on your head’

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Written By Maya Cantina
  • The car rammed into the main gates of Buckingham Palace early on Saturday  

The gates of Buckingham Palace have been boarded up after a driver crashed into them in a late-night smash.  

Officers rushed to the scene after a car rammed into the main entrance gates of the royal residence in Westminster, central London, in the early hours of Saturday morning. 

New footage shows the stunning gates blighted with wooden panels and scaffolding today as the damages caused by the smash are repaired. 

Passers-by can be seen observing the boarded gates with confusion as they walk past the palace this morning. 

The Met Police confirmed a man was arrested on suspicion of criminal damage.

Armed officers were seen surrounding the driver who was on his knees as they ordered him to ‘keep your hands on your head’ at around 2.30am on Saturday. 

The gates of Buckingham Palace have been boarded up after a driver crashed into them in the early hours of Saturday morning 

The car that smashed into the royal gates is seen after the smash on Saturday morning

The car that smashed into the royal gates is seen after the smash on Saturday morning 

Footage shows the gates blighted with wooden panels and scaffolding today as the damages caused by the smash are repaired

Footage shows the gates blighted with wooden panels and scaffolding today as the damages caused by the smash are repaired

Scaffolding remains in place after a man was arrested after crashing his vehicle into the gates

Scaffolding remains in place after a man was arrested after crashing his vehicle into the gates

Police officers are seen guarding the gates which are boarded up following the smash

Police officers are seen guarding the gates which are boarded up following the smash 

People walk past the boarded gates today after the collision in the early hours of Saturday morning

People walk past the boarded gates today after the collision in the early hours of Saturday morning 

The gates of Buckingham Palace are seen boarded up with wooden panels and scaffolding

The gates of Buckingham Palace are seen boarded up with wooden panels and scaffolding 

Footage shows a car crashing into the main gates of Buckingham Palace before armed police yell at the driver to keep his hands on his head

Footage shows a car crashing into the main gates of Buckingham Palace before armed police yell at the driver to keep his hands on his head 

Armed police were seen surrounding the driver who was on his knees and ordered to put his hands on his head

Armed police were seen surrounding the driver who was on his knees and ordered to put his hands on his head

A witness said he watched the dramatic scene unfold after hearing a 'loud bang'

A witness said he watched the dramatic scene unfold after hearing a ‘loud bang’ 

The incident happened at the main entrance gates of Buckingham Palace in Westminster, central London

The incident happened at the main entrance gates of Buckingham Palace in Westminster, central London

A witness to the incident, who wished to remain anonymous, said he watched the scene unfold after hearing ‘a loud bang’. 

‘I heard a loud bang, and I looked over and the car had crashed into Buckingham Palace,’ he said. 

‘Police were on the scene pretty quickly – and they got the man out and arrested him.’

The Met said there were no reports of any injuries. A police spokesperson said: ‘At approximately 02:33hrs on Saturday, 09 March a car collided with the gates of Buckingham Palace.

‘Armed officers arrested a man at the scene on suspicion of criminal damage. He was taken to hospital.

‘There were no reports of any injuries. Enquiries are ongoing to establish the circumstances.’

ᴀʀᴛɪᴄʟᴇ ꜱᴏᴜʀᴄᴇ

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