EU election hammer: Macron dissolves the National Assembly

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Written By Maya Cantina

The political earthquake in France has consequences. The victory of the Rassemblement National in the EU elections leads to new elections on June 30. President Emmanuel Macron dissolved the French National Assembly that evening.

According to official projections from the European Parliament, Marine Le Pen’s right-wing party received around 31.5 percent of the vote – an increase of around 8.2 points compared to the European elections five years ago.

Election debacle for Macron’s party

Macron’s Renaissance party, which this time called itself Besoin d’Europe, fell by 7.2 points to 15.2 percent. She still held second place, just ahead of the Socialists (14.0 percent).

According to the newspaper Current values Marine Le Pen spoke at 9:15 p.m. She was happy with her party’s performance in the EU elections and the dissolution of the National Assembly, which her party leader Jordan Bardella called for during his speech. She agreed to “take power.” At the beginning of the upcoming election campaign, she called on her supporters to mobilize for the upcoming elections.

If the parliamentary elections planned for the short term yield a similar result to the EU elections in France, Macron would no longer be able to form a government without Le Pen. Why he is still taking the step to dissolve the National Assembly is a mystery.

CDU Secretary General Carsten Linnemann said this early on Sunday evening disastrous European election results for the traffic light parties Most political observers shook their heads when he demanded that the chancellor use the vote of confidence to pave the way for new elections. Drawing the consequences of a devastating election defeat is what separates Germany from France. (fh/hpr)



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