Marisa Burger: “Rosenheim Cops” star reveals strange details from the series

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Written By Maya Cantina

With the saying “Es gabat a Leich”, Marisa Burger (50) played her way into the hearts of “The Rosenheim Cops” as secretary Miriam Stockl.

Since 2002, Burger has been part of the Bavarian crime series, with which she achieved her breakthrough as an actress. She was initially not given the role of Secretary Stockl. It wasn’t until the team behind the cameras was changed during filming that the new director remembered Marisa Burger’s casting and gave her another chance. “Fortunately, the role worked out on the second try,” the actress told the Acturtain.com portal five years ago.

Marisa Burger: Miriam Stockl’s role has evolved

The 24th season of ‘The Rosenheim Cops’ is now being filmed and after more than twenty years, Marisa Burger still enjoys her role as Miriam Stockl. “It’s something special when you embody a character that people like,” Burger said in an interview with SZ.

Initially conceived as a small supporting role, Miriam Stockl became increasingly present over the years and has now developed into one of the main characters in the TV series with which Burger could grow. While the secretary initially wanted to get married by looking through wedding catalogs, she now contributes a lot to solving the cases.

Marisa Burger at work – with them
Marisa Burger at work – at the “Rosenheim Cops” as Miriam Stockl with her colleague Michi Mohr (Max Müller).
© ZDF/Christian A. Rieger
Marisa Burger at work – at the “Rosenheim Cops” as Miriam Stockl with her colleague Michi Mohr (Max Müller).

by ZDF/Christian A. Rieger

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A role development that is now also noticeable for Marisa Burger in terms of fees. The 50-year-old is now paid the same amount as the other leading actors. “It is very important for me to receive the same money as my colleagues and especially as my colleagues,” Burger told the SZ. But because people don’t talk about money, the Stockl actress came up with the idea late to adjust her fee. “It took me a while to figure out what the guys on set were paid.”

Because Marisa Burger has been for this for a long time ZDF According to her own statement, the actress is now in a “privileged position” when it comes to compensation.

Marisa Burger: Parents didn’t want her to become an actress

However, it was a long and difficult road for Burger to get there. Marisa Burger did not have an easy relationship with her parents, who did not want her daughter to become an actress, as the 50-year-old writes in her autobiography “Never forget what your heart was like in the beginning: about the courage to go your own way. “

Her parents came from a family of teachers and did not like being an actress. “Just the thought of it was terrifying. ‘You’re not making any money!’, ‘All those unemployed actors!’, ‘And what are you going to do if it doesn’t work out?’ But I was not deterred,” you can read in her book.

Burger was unstoppable. Even after being rejected from the Otto Falckenberg School in Munich, the actress stuck to her dream career and was able to secure a place on the second attempt. But Burger could not pay the costs of the training there out of his own pocket; she needed financial support from her family. ‘With pounding heart I called my father […] Could he and my mother support me?” After a long silence, her father indirectly gave her and her career choice his blessing: “Yes, we will support you,” Burger says in her autobiography.

Marisa Burger: ‘My mother only watches ‘Rosenheim Cops’ when I’m not playing along’

Although Burger’s parents have supported their daughter financially, her mother still seems not to have fully accepted the acting profession. “My mother only watches ‘Rosenheim Cops’ when I’m not playing,” the Stockl actress confesses to SZ.



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