Syrians in particular are receiving passports: a dramatic increase in the number of naturalizations

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Written By Maya Cantina

BERLIN. The number of naturalizations in the Federal Republic reached the highest level in 25 years in 2023. In 2023, a total of 200,095 people became German citizens, corresponding to an increase of approximately 19 percent compared to the previous year Federal Statistical Office announced on Tuesday. With 75,485 naturalizations Syrians are by far the largest groupfollowed by Turkey with 10,735 and Iraq with 10,710 passports.

Naturalizations in the Federal Republic: These are the most important countries of origin Source: Destatis Screenshot: JF

A total of 7,575 Romanians received a German passport last year, 6,520 Afghans and 6,420 Iranians. 5,910 new citizens come from Ukraine and 5,440 from Poland. The number of naturalized Iraqis has grown the most, there it was 57 percent more than the year before, and there was also a strong increase from Syria of 56 percent.

Naturalization of spouses and children plays a major role

According to the Federal Statistical Office, 64 percent of naturalized Syrians last year were men. On average, naturalization took almost seven years. “Spouses and minor children can also be naturalized without a minimum period of residence,” the federal agency says. In 2023, this affected approximately 28,000, or 37 percent, of naturalized Syrians.

The last time more people were naturalized was in 1999 than last year. Between 1994 and 1999, mainly Russian Germans were naturalized. Because their immigration decreased over time and the then red-green federal government changed the nationality law in 2000 so that children born in Germany automatically received a German passport, the number of naturalizations decreased again from the turn of the millennium. (st)

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